The End of the Tour (2015) 720p YIFY Movie

The End of the Tour (2015)

The End of the Tour is a movie starring Jason Segel, Jesse Eisenberg, and Anna Chlumsky. The story of the five-day interview between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace, which took place...

IMDB: 7.30 Likes

  • Genre: Biography | Drama
  • Quality: 720p
  • Size: 1.31G
  • Resolution: / fps
  • Language: English
  • Run Time: 106
  • IMDB Rating: 7.3/10 
  • MPR: Normal
  • Peers/Seeds: 0 / 1

The Synopsis for The End of the Tour (2015) 720p

The story of the five-day interview between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace, which took place right after the 1996 publication of Wallace's groundbreaking epic novel, 'Infinite Jest.'


The Director and Players for The End of the Tour (2015) 720p

[Director]James Ponsoldt
[Role:]Jesse Eisenberg
[Role:]Jason Segel
[Role:]Anna Chlumsky
[Role:]Mamie Gummer


The Reviews for The End of the Tour (2015) 720p


Tedious visually: but of curiosity to the literaryReviewed byBofsensaiVote: 2/10

What can I add than to warn: if you think the art form of film should primarily be about the visual - acting can be appreciated in the theatre - where this rightly belongs - then, this effort simply fails: it's tedious to watch: nothing of import or dramatic really ever happens: merely two talking heads (á la 'My Dinner with Andre' style) - yet intriguing (occasionally) to listen to, if only for Segel delivering the lines that supposedly the real DFW author shared with Rolling Stone's Lipsky.

But that's the problem: it reminded me of the sort of compilation of leftovers and demos etc that rock bands put together to scrape the barrel after their demise from glory: occasional gems (one on, ah, 'self pleasuring' in particular! - see the quotes sidebar :-), but otherwise, mostly underwhelming dross. Then, true if Segel is the stand out in delivering those lines, but as his interlocutor interviewer, JE once again delivers unfortunately one of his characteristic tic ridden, nervy, too fast paced throwaway whiny lines, which with the regular effete laughter he interjects into almost every response to Segel's DFW life observations, just left me irritated, unable to concentrate on any of those supposed pearls of wisdom JS/DFW confided.

But perhaps the major complaint / letdown by director and scriptwriter was that, as DFW tragically committed suicide, and these transcripts were published posthumously, we get no insight or revelation or indeed any sort of real reference for why such a waste of talent occurred - other than hinted at (mere?) loneliness ? which seemed either lazy or contemptuous of Ponsoldt and Marguilies, respectively!

In short, of far less importance than it (they? Ponsoldt, Margulies - Lipsky?!!) would have you think it is.

Could very well remain my favorite film of the yearReviewed byjjustinjaegerVote: 10/10

Rarely am I enlightened by a film in the way I was by this one. Not that I was lectured or taught something, but that I had a visceral response to what I had experienced on screen that I wouldn't be able to explain but to ask you to recall a song or a book or a show that invited you to pour your soul into it and in return reminded you of what it was like to have one. I was reminded that films can do this.

I don't expect everyone to like it to the degree that I did because I can only base my strong inclination towards this movie on the connection I personally made with it which was emotional rather than intellectual, although the film is rich and lingering in its intellect as well, and of course; I recognize what makes this film profound, which I'll try to explain.

This is a talky film from director James Ponsoldt, who I'd now have to rank as one of my favorite contemporary directors after this and another I've seen and loved, The Spectacular Now. This director isn't one you'd normally find on a list ranking among the greatest working today because he's not about style and doesn't appeal to the ego as much as other contemporaries such as Wes Anderson and David Fincher do (in addition to many others, not to single them out). No, Ponsoldt is subtle and reserves his ego. He is unimposing on the lives of his characters and candid about what his films are trying to do and say, not hiding beneath film rhetoric or allegory or the impression of a representational work. And what's great about this is how his films point out that you don't need intricate sets or perfectly symmetrical shots to create beauty. This film has some of the most beautiful shots I've seen (the shot of them walking in the snow, the shot of the normally- withdrawn Wallace dancing), all the more so because of their subtlety, giving the feeling that the beauty was discovered and not created by the director.

But the beauty is often created by the actors. Ponsoldt trusts his actors and puts his efforts towards making the characters come alive before our eyes. I was under the fantastic impression that I was witnessing a completely real human soul with Segel's performance. He felt so real, so three dimensional. I understand him, even though I am not him. This is more magical to me than sweeping camera movements or extravagant art direction.

I didn't realize when watching the film that the dialogue is all based on, if not directly taken from, the tapes journalist (and protagonist) David Lipsky (Eisenberg) recorded of his interviewee, universally acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace (Segel). The dialogue is rich with insight into the character's thought processes and their observations on life (but mostly those of Wallace). I was riveted at every moment the two were talking, feeling as though being revealed before me were the truths of life. The thrill of being a fly on the wall. And it's not just the words containing the wisdom of the thoughtful and complicated Wallace, but the delivery via the actors and the way in which the many hours of tape are edited to allow Wallace's ideas and observations to resonate. Even beyond Wallace's ideas, the film cuts to the core and observes Wallace as a human being, not different for his brilliance but the same for his humanness.

The film is about so many things it would be overwhelming to attempt list all of them. Its ideas, however many, are all-encompassing of what it means to exist, which is, beyond the desire for fame and ego-boosts, to want to be understood. The film observes how the inner-worlds of all people are so uniquely complicated and pays tribute to that wonder. I'll be relating my experiences to this film in time to come.

A thought provoking and emotional movieReviewed bynickweningerVote: 9/10

The End of The Tour was a beautifully done movie that will not be widely seen or even heard of. This movie doesn't have explosions, or side splitting humor, or sex, or anything that sells in Hollywood these days. What this movie does have is a well written plot with fantastic dialogue, a great story, wonderful performances, and thought provoking themes that make you ponder what is really important. The End of The Tour is about the five day interview between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky, and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace (played by Jesse Eisenberg and Jason Segel). This five day interview took place right after the 1996 publication of Wallace's epic 1,000 page novel called Infinite Jest. An interview that would later turn out to be never published and not really heard about until Wallace's 2008 suicide. During this interview, we get to see inside what it is like between the two men. Like I said earlier, this movie asks a lot of deeper questions that will leave you thinking. Questions like what is really important? If I am unhappy right now, will having what someone has change that? That even being famous and looked upon by the public doesn't really make you truly happy. We have seen this time and time again with famous celebrities that everyone thinks has it all together, give it all away because of depression and loneliness. This movie does an excellent job of portraying that. My only critique about this movie is that you never really get to know the character David who was doing the interview. They allude to deeper issues within him but never dive into them and expose them. Average Man Score: 8/10

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